Ex concessis

Legal Glossary (English and Latin) - E

Ei incumbit probatio qui

The Latin term "Ei incumbit probatio qui" means, in a UK legal context: "the onus of proving a fact rests upon the man".

Employers Liability

The liability of an employer to pay damages to employees for personal injuries sustained in the course of employment.

In general, an accident arising out of the course of employment will be deemed, in the absence of evidence to the contrary, to have arisen out of that employment.

Employment Contract

The contractual agreement between employer and employee governing their employment relationship.

There must also be a written statement of the terms containing certain minimum conditions of employment which have to be included by statute. Certain terms may be implied by common-law (e.g. fidelity) by custom and practice or by collective agreements.

Ex cathedra

The Latin term "Ex cathedra" means, in a UK legal context: "with official authority".

Et cetera

The Latin term "Et cetera" means "other things of that type ".

Ex concessis

The Latin term "Ex concessis" means, in a UK legal context: "in view of what has already been accepted"

Ex facie

The Latin term "Ex facie" means, in a UK legal context: "on the fact of it".

Ex gratia

The Latin term "Ex gratia" means, in a UK legal context: "out of kindness, voluntary".

Ex parte

The Latin term "Ex parte" means, in a UK legal context: "proceeding brought by one person in the absence of another ".

Ex post facto

The Latin term "Ex post facto" means, in a UK legal context: "by reason of a subsequent act".

Extraordinary General Meeting

Prior to the Companies Act 2006 coming into force, any meeting of a company's shareholders other than an annual general meeting was known as an Extraordinary General Meeting. The Companies Act 2006 abolished Extraordinary General Meetings.

A company's meetings are now, simply, General Meetings. Notice of (at least) 14 days must be given for any General Meeting.

Extraordinary Resolution

Prior to the Companies Act 2006 coming into force companies were required to make certain decisions via an extraordinary resolution. The Companies Act 2006 abolished Extraordinary Resolutions.

There are now two types of resolution a company can pass: an ordinary resolution and a special resolution. A resolution can be passed by a private company using either the written resolution procedure or at a general meeting.

 
T&Cs Documents by Trade
Documents by Section
News and Information